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Environmental Respect 2018: Chesapeake, Corteva, and Crabs

Corteva personnel explained to the gathered guests how Corteva has significantly expanded its product offerings over the past year.

On Day Three of the annual Environmental Respect Awards Celebration Week, program sponsor Corteva AgriScience took the opportunity to educate attendees about the part of the world the company calls home, its product offerings, and a bit of local cuisine. To do this, Corteva took everyone at the event to nearby Chesapeake Farms. An extensive plot of land in Maryland on the Chesapeake Bay, Chesapeake Farms has been owned by Corteva since 1956. It is used by the company for farming activities and as a wildlife preserve.

After taking a two-hour bus ride to the farm, Environmental Respect Award attendees were split into four different groups, taking the time to visit various informational stations set up on the Chesapeake Farms grounds. At each station, Corteva employees were on hand to provide attendees with information about the company’s numerous products, covering everything from crop protection products to seed traits to digital farming programs. The representatives then took questions from the audience about these offerings.

Corteva’s Marv Wilson

At one of the educational stations, Corteva personnel explained to the gathered guests how Corteva has significantly expanded its product offerings over the past year or so as legacy companies DuPont and Dow have combined their operations. “We are now able to bring in seed traits that used to be part of Dow and can combine them with germplasms that used to be part of DuPont,” said Corteva’s Marv Wilson. “Plus, we have a whole lot of new crop protection products at our disposal that neither company could provide to the market and our customers when we were separate companies.”

Besides looking at the current slate of Corteva products, representatives also spent part of their time telling Environmental Respect Award attendees about what future endeavors the company will be working on to further the cause of agriculture around the globe. In particular, said Wilson, Corteva has high hopes for some of the gene editing techniques now coming into the marketplace. “CRISPR Cas technology could allow companies such as Corteva to do very innovative things with seed traits moving forward,” said Wilson.

Attendees gathered in the picnic area of Chesapeake Farms for an annual Environmental Respect Awards Celebration Week tradition – a lunch of the area’s blue crabs.

In addition to improving seed traits, Corteva’s Bill Belzer took attendees about the likely importance of the use of technology in farming will be as traceability becomes more of a market driver for end-users and consumers. “Digital farming will become even a bigger trend then it is today,” predicted Belzer. “And Corteva will be ready with two different platforms for this trend – Granular, which is our financial program, and Encirca, which is for agronomy.”

Once the educational sessions were complete, attendees gathered in the picnic area of Chesapeake Farms for an annual Environmental Respect Awards Celebration Week tradition – a lunch of the area’s blue crabs. Corteva’s Ray Forney gave a quick tutorial to everyone on the “proper technique” for opening their crabs for eating.

“The crab tasted pretty good,” said Josh Johnston of Nutrien Ag Solutions, Morganfield, KY, when asked. “But it was a lot of work getting all the meat out!” Johnston finished his lunch by having a much easier to eat hamburger.